The little known Seiko 7s55 caliber

 SLX003031The little known Seiko 7s55 caliber

When it comes to Seiko’s entry level automatic movements, most people will readily think of the well-liked and reliable 7s-caliber automatics that are found in the garden variety SKX and limited edition SKZ divers and of course, the popular Seiko 5 family of affordable watches.

The 7s26 is perhaps the most widely known movement in the 7s-family and is extensively used in the base line Seiko 5 model. The Seiko 5 Sports and Seiko 5 Superiors are adorned with the slightly upmarket 7s36 movement, which has 23 jewels – two more jewels than what the 7s26 has. Limited production run 7s-caliber divers such as the SKZ203K Yellow Monster and the SKZ201K Seiko 5 40th Anniversary diver’s watches also use the 7s36.

So what’s interesting about the 7s55?


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Originally posted 2010-02-12 00:03:54.

Watch shopping in Kuala Lumpur (Citron Watch)

 DSC00621 DCEWinCE1Watch shopping in Kuala Lumpur (Citron Watch)

Pertama Complex is one of the oldest shopping malls in the heart of Kuala Lumpur. Strategically located at the intersection of the famous Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman (previously known as Batu Road) and Jalan Dang Wangi (formerly called Campbell Road). It was first built in 1976 and was the hive of activity amongst local shoppers and tourists alike in its heydays.

Today, Pertama Complex (literal translation: (the) First Complex) has been overshadowed and outclassed by the ultra modern shopping malls in Kuala Lumpur and in the outskirts of the capital of Malaysia. Tourists, from overseas or out-of-town tend to flock to the newer and bigger shopping destinations, such as the Suria KLCC, Sungei Wang Plaza, Mid Valley Mega Mall and the likes.

If you’re expecting first class rest rooms, creature comforts, photogenic interiors, modern bistros and Starbucks – forget it. Pertama Complex is a basic, no frills retail center for bargain hunters who know what they want.


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Originally posted 2009-08-10 23:49:15.

Seiko SNKF11K “BFS” Automatic review

 

snkf11kwince1Seiko SNKF11K “BFS” Automatic review

 

Watch History

 

 

Background

I seldom buy watches on impulse. Usually I would conduct several weeks or months of research and mulling about before deciding to buy a particular watch. When my watchmaker took out the stunning looking timepiece out of his box (he hadn’t even had the time to display it in his watch glass case) my jaw simply dropped.

“Wow! What IS that Seiko?” I blurted out. It wasn’t a Seiko 5 and it was the largest 7s-caliber Seiko that I’ve ever laid eyes upon. It was even larger than the SKX007 and even the Monster diver! My watchmaker said he didn’t know, he had just taken delivery of a new batch of Seikos earlier that morning.

I looked at the hang tag and it said SNKF11K. I’m usually blasé towards new releases from Seiko (they’re usually a rehash of old models with minor design tweaks) but this one was a totally fresh design. I thought it was one of the very few models that Seiko got it right from the start.


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Originally posted 2008-07-22 21:16:00.

How to tell when your Seiko watch was made (Part 2)

closeup small1How to tell when your Seiko watch was made (Part 2)

In my previous article on how to date your Seiko watch, I mentioned the nifty Jayhawk's Production Date Calculator. In most cases it should return the correct date of manufacture.

However, there are circumstances in which the calculator may give you inconclusive or erroneous results. Or no results at all. When that happens, I would resort to what I call "dead reckoning" or rough estimation.

Dead reckoning is similar to navigating your way at sea by orientating yourself with the heavenly objects like the sun, moon and the stars. You won't be accounting for wind conditions and at best your estimate may be a few miles off your actual position. That's when a GPS unit comes in handy! icon winkHow to tell when your Seiko watch was made (Part 2)

Manually estimating the production date of a Seiko involves the element of anachronism. What is anachronism? Basically, it is the utilization of an event, a person, an object, language in a time when that event, person or object was not in existence. In other words, an anachronism is something that occurs out of its proper time. The chronological error of an anachronism can occur in either direction; it can result from something from the past being represented as if it belonged in the present, like an archaism, or it can result from presenting something at a time before it actually appeared, occurred, or existed.

And anachronism is the key to manually estimating the production date of your Seiko watch.


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Originally posted 2008-07-16 20:29:46.

Seiko SNA141P military chronograph review

 sna141p1 small1Seiko SNA141P military chronograph review

Watch History

 

Background

This nice looking watch actually fulfilled two of my personal watch collecting criteria. Firstly, I was looking for a military look Seiko and secondly, I decided to have a representative from the 7T62 alarm chronograph family. I was aware of the various military-styled Seiko 5 watches available, such as the SNK427K model and its cousins but they were non-chronograph watches.

It took some mulling about for several months before I decided to buy the SNA141P. This model wasn't found at the local watch stores in Kuala Lumpur so I had to resort to buying from Pokemonyu on eBay. I knew that Seiko is notorious for discontinuing models that they feel are not their best-sellers (whether you really like the watch or not) so I made up my mind to get one before the SNA141P was pulled off the market.


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Originally posted 2008-06-30 21:20:28.

Seiko Prospex SBDC001 Scuba 200m review

s sbdc001a1Seiko Prospex SBDC001 Scuba 200m review

Watch History

  • Date acquired: Apr 21 2007
  • Production date: Mar 2007
  • Source: Higuchi Inc, Japan
  • Price paid: JPY47,000 (USD429)
  • Status: In production

    Background

    When stock photos of the SBDC-series divers first appeared on the Internet in early 2007, it created huge ripples in the watch forum communities. It caused widespread excitement and speculation among the Seiko diver watch fans. This was the watch that Seiko enthusiasts had been eagerly anticipating for a very long time. It wasn't just the fact that these were entirely new models, they were also the first Seiko divers based on the relatively new manual winding and hacking 6R15 automatic caliber.


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    Originally posted 2008-01-04 00:16:00.

    Seiko SKX031K “Submariner” review

    skx031 frontsideSeiko SKX031K “Submariner” review

    Watch History

    Background

    Pop quiz folks – what resembles a Rolex Submariner watch, says “SEIKO” on the dial, has a screw-in crown and costs a fraction of the price of the watch that it pays homage to?

    No prizes for guessing, it’s none other than the Seiko SKX031K – Seiko’s timeless tribute to the Rolex Submariner. The SKX031K has been around for over a decade (it debuted in 1996 with the introduction of the 7s26 automatic caliber) and sales of this model appears to be still going strong despite its age in the market.


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    Originally posted 2008-10-17 07:46:00.